Links

Links for Kids

Environmental awareness is world-wide. Information is being shared all the time on doing thisngs better. We were told about this website by a scout in the US doing an environmental awareness badge. While this link, provided by a friendly group of Girl Scouts in California, USA, contains some information on recycling. You can normally find more information on local recycling facilities and collection points from your local council. Recycle NowIn the UK, you can find more information about recycling at Recycle Now.

ARKive’s free fun-packed teaching resources are suitable for 5-18 year olds and cover a range of key science and biology subjects including: adaptation, endangered species, food chains, Darwin and natural selection, classification, identification, conservation and biodiversity. ArkiveThese teaching resources include: classroom presentations, activities and handouts, teachers' notes as well as links to ARKive species profiles and scrapbooks.

ArticleMyriadHere you can find lots of ideas of things to make by recycling paper - craft work, painting and lots of other things. It also tells you why it's so important to re-use and recycle materials.
Thanks to Mary and her teacher in Seattle for telling us about this website.

Discovery EducationWe know less about life in the earth under our feet than we do about the far side of the moon. Yet every plant and animal you can think of depends on this vast hidden ecosystem. Each shovel of soil holds more living things than all the human beings ever born. Lots of species are still waiting for scientists to identify and name them. This is a world where fungi lay traps for thread-like worms. Bacteria dine on toxic chemicals. The smaller the creature, the stranger are its habits. Dig into this underground universe and meet its tiny but helpful residents.

Global WarmingEarth has warmed by about 1ºC over the past 100 years. But why? And how? Well, scientists are not exactly sure. The Earth could be getting warmer on its own, but many of the world's leading climate scientists think that things people do are helping to make the Earth warmer.

The Eco-Schools programme provides a simple framework to enable your school to analyse its operations and become more sustainable. ECoSchoolsBy following the programme, your school will become a more stimulating place in which to learn, whilst reducing the environmental impact of the whole school on the community.

RSPB KidsWelcome to RSPB Kids! If you like birds and wildlife you've come to the right website. These pages are full of fun and facts - so don't waste time, start exploring the site! If you're a teacher, parent or youth leader, we've included information especially for you on some of the pages.

Nature DetectivesFor lots of fun ideas of things to see and do, visit this Woodlands Trust site.

 

Nation Energy FederationThe National Energy Foundation's website is for teachers and children who want to find out more about alternative sources of energy, such as solar and wind power.

Young Peoples TrustThe Young People's Trust for the Environment is a charity which aims to encourage young people's understanding of the environment and the need for sustainability. With climate change being such a big issue for us all, there has probably never been a more important time for environmental education. The next generation is going to inherit a huge array of environmental challenges, so it is vital that they are equipped with the knowledge they need to look after the planet for the future.

Bumblebee Conservation trustThe Bumblebee Conservation Trust was founded in response to growing concerns about the 'plight of the bumblebee'. Three species are already extinct in the UK and several others have experienced dramatic declines. We aim to prevent further declines, and to raise awareness of the problems bumblebees face. We now have over 2,300 members ranging from enthusiastic and concerned amateurs right through to internationally renowned research scientists. All of us share a common affection for these affable insects and a desire to see them conserved for future generations.

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